Saturday, November 22, 2014

USA: GOP rebukes county chairman's 'outrageous' comments on Muslims

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“Muslims are terrorists. They don’t belong in this country. Their attitude and their agenda don’t belong in this country. They cause terror and discontent, total chaos everywhere they are.”

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | US Desk
Source/Credit: Star Tribune
By Jennifer Brooks | November 21, 2014

Party chair for Big Stone County said “Muslims are terrorists.”

A Minnesota Republican Party official issued a “call to arms” against Muslims on Thursday, calling them “terrorists” and “parasites” and suggesting that someone should “frag ‘em.”

Jack Whitley, chairman of the Big Stone County Republican Party, had no apology for the series of inflammatory posts on his personal Facebook page — remarks the state party leadership condemned as “outrageous.”

“Muslims are terrorists. They don’t belong in this country,” Whitley said in an interview. “Their attitude and their agenda don’t belong in this country. They cause terror and discontent, total chaos everywhere they are.”

Pakistan: Christian Man dies after torture in Lahore police custody

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The incident came to the notice of senior police officials when family members protested by burning tyres in front of the police station, pelting stones and trying to forcibly enter the premises.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Dawn News
By Waseem Riaz | November 22, 2014

LAHORE: A 35-year-old man in Lahore died Saturday morning after what his family claim to be alleged torture during interrogation at the Green Town police station.

The police, however, say that Allah Rakha – a member of the Christian community who was taken into custody on Friday for purportedly selling narcotics – died of a heart attack.

The incident came to the notice of senior police officials when family members protested by burning tyres in front of the police station, pelting stones and trying to forcibly enter the premises.

Taking notice, DIG Operations Dr Haider Ashraf ordered that an FIR be lodged against the investigation officer and three constables from the Green Town station.

Confluence of religion and politics: Extremism on the rise in Indonesia

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According to the AI report, over the past decade, minority groups have increasingly been targeted in mob violence or other attacks, with perpetrators rarely held to account.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Deutsche Welle
By Gabriel Domínguez | November 21, 2014

Bush: 'Confluence of religious intolerance and the rising power of state institutions to regulate religion are reasons for the increase in blasphemy convictions'

A new AI report claims Indonesia is making use of 'oppressive' blasphemy laws to jail people for their beliefs. Analyst Robin Bush talks to DW about why the country is witnessing a rise in religious intolerance.

Titled Prosecuting Beliefs, the report by the rights group Amnesty International focuses on the rise in the number of blasphemy-related convictions during former Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's decade in power (2004-2014). The paper, released on Friday, November 21, documents the cases of more than 100 individuals convicted of blasphemy in Indonesia over the past decade.

Eye on persecution: Amnesty slams Indonesia's 'oppressive' blasphemy laws

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The paper, published on Friday, November 21, focuses on the rise in the number of blasphemy-related convictions during former President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's decade in power (2004-2014) compared to previous administrations.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Deutsche Welle
By Gabriel Domínguez | November 21, 2014

Amnesty slams Indonesia's 'oppressive' blasphemy laws
http://www.dw.de/amnesty-slams-indonesias-oppressive-blasphemy-laws/a-18075486

A new report by Amnesty International accuses Indonesia of upholding blasphemy laws which the rights group views as fueling harassment, intimidation and attacks against religious minorities in the Southeast Asian nation.

In terms of religion, Alexander Aan is not a typical Indonesian. The 30-year-old public servant from the province of West Sumatra is a non-believer. While the world's most populous Muslim country protects the rights of members of other religious groups such as Buddhists, Confucians and Christians, the same privileges do not apply for atheists. Promoting one's disbelief in God may therefore trigger not only social exclusion, but even land someone in prison.

Canada: Local Ahmadiyya Muslim group fights back against ISIS

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The event is part of a nationwide campaign called Stop The CrISIS that kicked off earlier this month in Ontario and includes 35 events across Canada.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | USDesk
Source/Credit: BC Local News
By BC Local News | November 21, 2014

The fear of Canadian Muslim youth being ‘radicalized’ and carrying out attacks on home turf became reality after the recent events Ottawa and Quebec.

To combat that looming threat, the Abbotsford chapter of Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at is hosting an event on Monday (Nov. 24) to “take a stand against youth radicalization and the extremist influence that ISIS can have on our youth.”

The event is part of a nationwide campaign called Stop The CrISIS that kicked off earlier this month in Ontario and includes 35 events across Canada. The event in Abbotsford will feature a keynote speaker, multimedia presentations and Q&A with a panel of Islamic scholars, organizers say.

Perspective: Save minorities, save Pakistan

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Punishment against those involved in vigilantism and mob behaviour against minorities has to be in place. Today, if minorities are being targeted, tomorrow there will be targeting based on political beliefs or financial status

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Daily Times | Pakistan
By Hussain Nadim | November 21, 2014

“I went to the west and saw Islam, but no Muslims; I went back to the East and saw Muslims but no Islam.” The unfortunate part of Muhammad Abduh’s 18th century observation of the Islamic world is that it holds the exact (if not more) value today in the Muslim world than it did when he first felt such a dichotomy. The curse of colonisation, or the abuse of religion by its guardians — depending upon whom you talk to — is something for which the answer varies. The fact, however, does not change that every day, more minority members suffer and even more minority members take asylum in foreign countries.

To deal with the minority issue we have to anchor our efforts in the community that suffers the worst form of persecution so that there is a bottom up rights movement. We may refer to the African-American community that faced the worst kind of discrimination in the US but became a domino that brought the civil rights movement to other marginalised groups.

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